The Beginning of What Was to Come

December 04, 2013

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Christian14yrsoldI took Christian to a bike camp this past summer to help with learning how to riding a bike. He was so hypotonic when he was little, it was too hard for him to learn how to ride a bike and he got so frustrated. He gave up and I didn’t want to make him hate it, so we took a long break from it. At the end of the five-day camp, Christian could ride a bike! Learning how to ride a bike has helped with his balance and coordination, along with awareness and independence. He rides every chance he gets. This year, he also learned how to spit while brushing his teeth. We have tried and tried to teach this concept, but he couldn’t get it . I believe that biomed helped him achieve this goal as well. We celebrate every little milestone he achieves.

My son’s eyes don’t look glazed over anymore. He use to look lost and it was like he was in a fog. He is slowly getting better and we have had moments of clarity. Most importantly, Christian has a personality. He is so sweet and caring as he always was, but he is also funny. He’s like a little goofball, but before none of that existed. He has also begun to be more independent.

Not long ago, we went back to the pediatrician we hadn’t seen since 2010. He didn’t know that we weaned off the meds or what was going on in our lives. The doctor was amazed and couldn’t believe how much my son has changed. He said he is so much more aware than before, and his speech and vocabulary have improved. He couldn’t get over how well Christian was talking now and how engaged he was. His eye contact and social skills are so much better. It felt great to have someone who hasn’t seen us in a while tell me that what I have been doing with my son is working and he looks great and seems like he is doing great! We still have a long way to go and things still need to improve, but I really do have hope for my son’s future and his health. Never give up. It’s really true when they tell you that autism is not a race, it’s a marathon. And now I know, autism is medical, too.